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India & More

Location: District Bandipore.
Volume: It contains approximately 18,900 cubic miles of water (78,700 cubic kilometers).
Altitude: 1580 m
Surface Area: 12 to 100 sq mi (30 to 260 kmĀ²)

Wular Lake

Wular Lake (also spelt Wullar) is a large fresh water lake in Bandipore district in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. The lake basin was formed as a result of tectonic activity and is fed by the Jhelum River. The lake's size varies from 12 to 100 square miles (30 to 260 square kilometers), depending on the season.

Claimed to be the largest freshwater lake in India, the Wular lake can spread over nearly 200-sq-kms but its actual surface area tends to vary during the year. The Jhelum River flows into the lake, 40-km downstream from Srinagar, and then out again. The lake, calm though it may appear, is noted for the fierce winds that sometimes blow up. The deepest part of the lake is known as Mota Khon, the 'Gulf of corpses', since the bodies of people drowned in the lake were all supposed to be washed to this place. At one time there was an artificial island on the lake, where boatmen could shelter if the weather turned bad, but silting on that side of the lake has joined the island to the lakeside. It's now a popular picnic spot.

The lake is spread over an area of two hundred square kilometers, but the surface area of the lake varies from season to season. The Jhelum River evacuates into the lake at Babyari, which is forty kilometers downstream from Srinagar and again separates at Ningli. The floodwater of the Jhelum River acts as a natural reservoir.

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